Introduction to seahorses

Image: 
Lined seahorse
Caption: 
Lined seahorse. Photo by Ning Ning Gong/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2005
Description: 
Seahorses are unique fish. Not only are they monogomous, but they are the only animal in which the male gives birth to the young. There are nearly 50 species of seahorse found in the shallow seas of the world.
Image: 
Pair bond - Thorny seahorses
Caption: 
Thorny seahorses. Photo by Bettina Belnis/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2010
Description: 
Seahorses appear to be monogamous, remaining faithful to one partner for the duration of the breeding season and perhaps over several seasons. The female and male greet daily - changing colour and dancing together.
Image: 
Pregnant male
Caption: 
Pregnant male short-snout seahorse. Photo by Luc Rooman/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2010
Description: 
The female deposits her eggs in the male’s pouch, then the male fertilizes them. The pouch acts like a womb, providing nutrients and oxygen to the developing animals.
Image: 
Newborn seahorses
Description: 
After two weeks to one month the male goes into labour - pumping and thrusting for hours to release his brood. The young are miniature adult seahorses, independent from birth, and receive no further parental care.
Image: 
Ambush predator - Bargibant's seahorse
Caption: 
Bargibant's seahorse. Photo by Jaap Van Duijvenbode/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2010
Description: 
Seahorses are voracious predators, relying entirely on live, moving food. They wait until prey comes close enough and then suck it quickly out of the water with their long snouts. They have no stomach or teeth.
Image: 
Seahorse
Caption: 
Long-snouted seahorse. Photo by Tahsin Ceylan/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2005
Description: 
While seahorses appear to be very different from other fishes in the sea, they are fish nonetheless. They range from 5mm to 30cm in height.
Image: 
Thorny seahorse
Caption: 
Thorny seahorse. Photo by Jef Driesen/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2008
Description: 
Instead of scales, seahorses have thin skin stretched over a series of bony plates. Some species also have spines, bony bumps, or skin filaments.
Image: 
Denise's seahorse- variety
Caption: 
Denise's seahorse. Photo by Jan Azier/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2010
Description: 
Seahorses are masters of camouflage, changing colour and growing skin filaments to blend in with their surroundings.
Image: 
Seahorse habitat
Caption: 
Photo by Ronny De Pesseroy/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2010
Description: 
Seahorses live in the ocean, generally among seagrass beds, mangrove roots, and coral reefs, in shallow temperate and tropical waters.
Image: 
seahorse threats - bycatch
Caption: 
Bycatch. Photo by Sarah Foster/Project Seahorse
Description: 
There are many threats to seahorses; threatened by the destruction of their habitats through human activities. Many seahorses are caught accidentally in fishing nets, particularly in trawl nets intended to catch shrimp.
Image: 
threat - TCM
Caption: 
Photo by Tyler Stiem/Project Seahorse
Description: 
Seahorses are used in traditional medicine, aquarium fishes, curios (souvenirs), and tonic foods. Traditional Chinese medicine is the largest direct market for seahorses, but they are also used in other traditional medicines.
Image: 
seahorse yo-yo
Caption: 
Photo by Project Seahorse
Description: 
Dried seahorses are often incorporated into jewelry, key chains, paper weights, and other crafts.
Image: 
Solutions - research
Caption: 
Photo by Amanda Vincent/Project Seahorse
Description: 
Project Seahorse undertakes research and management options to drive the recovery of seahorse populations and habitats around the world.
Image: 
Solutions MPA
Caption: 
Photo by Kerrie O'Donnell/Project Seahorse
Description: 
We have generated 34 locally-managed marine protected areas and protocols for effective conservation of many marine fish species, including seahorses.
Image: 
Golden couple
Caption: 
Bargibant's seahorses. Photo by Sam Taylor/Guylian Seahorses of the World 2005
Description: 
If we get it right for seahorses we will keep our oceans alive.

Seahorses are unique fish.  Not only are they monogomous, but they are the only animal in which the male gives birth to the young.